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Archive for the ‘ETHNICITY’ Category

URO TODAY: Different environmental and/or genetic factors mean prostate cancer arises for different reasons in Western men when compared with those from China, research finds. READ MORE>

Our findings suggest that tumors arise in Western and Chinese populations by alternative pathogenetic mechanisms.

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WHITIREIA journalism student CARL SUURMOND went to the Chatham Islands with the Prostate Cancer Foundation last weekend. Here’s his first report (see below for his SLIDE SHOW):

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FLYING PROSTATE TEAM: from left, Carl Suurmond, Dene Ainsworth, Daniel Marshall, David Mason, Ash Zoias, Kelvin McDonald and Joe Tapara.

PROSTABLOG NZ: The men of the Chatham Islands are a tough  breed of fishermen and farmers whose work environments have shaped their hardwearing demeanour – but it’s the women of the island who are really tough.

Without the support and encouragement of wives, partners and mothers, many of the male inhabitants of the island may not have turned up at the presentations on prostate cancer held over the weekend.

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Prostate Cancer Foundation board member Dene Ainsworth (left) and Joe Tapara.

That’s the view of Joe Tapara (Ngāti Ruanui),  cultural adviser for the Hao Te Ora o Wharekauri Trust and member of the Chatham Islands Māori Community Health.

“The wives and the partners were the reason why so many men turned up,” he said. “Without them nagging, I’m not sure how many would have bothered.”

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Dene (right) in the jump seat behind the pilots.

The weekend presentations aimed to raise awareness of prostate cancer and promote early detection, with a focus on reducing fatalities amongst Māori men.

Maori are less likely to be diagnosed early and suffer a death rate after diagnosis that is twice that of non-Māori.

The trip was funded and organised by the NZ Prostate Cancer Foundation, in conjunction with Māori Community Health and Chatham Island Health Care.

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David Mason (right) and Daniel Marshall get checked out on a boat at Port Hutt.

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ISLAND FOOD: The team is spoiled at Kaingaroa.

The team included the expertise of urologist Dave Mason and trainee urologist registrar Daniel Marshall, both from Hastings.

Otaki’s Dene Ainsworth (Te Āti Awa Iwi), a board member on the foundation, and prostate cancer survivor, shared his own experience during four well-attended presentations to several communities around the island, which is 800km off the coast of Christchurch.

Chathams 11

Dene speaks to one of the Chathams gatherings.

In total, 40 men out of 135 over the age of 40 – and a few women – turned out, and in small communities like Kaingaroa Harbour, Owenga and Port Hutt just about all the male population was there to have their questions and concerns answered.

The tour round the main of the Chathams group was organised by Mr Tapara, with plenty of help from other locals.

Mr Ainsworth said the weekend was a great success and the desired outcome had been achieved.

“It was a bloody awesome weekend.  I think we achieved more than we could have ever hoped for.  The reaction from the islanders was first class and they’re really keen to get us to go back and do this on a regular basis.”

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Mr Mason and his colleague were there to address medical concerns and provide advice.

“I think the turnout has been amazing,” said Dave Mason.  “Each place that we’ve been to, the guys have come out and talked about things in different ways and brought up different concerns.

“There was a good bit of interest and a good spread of age groups.”

Mr Marshall said the men were not shy about asking questions.

“From talking to them afterwards it seems they’ve got a lot out of it.  They certainly haven’t been shy in asking questions and finding out what they want to know, which is what it’s all about.

“Seeing the island, seeing the style of life here, the way everyone gets on so well in the community here – it’s been brilliant.”

ChathamsPano1

The waterfont at Waitangi, the main settlement.

The weekend came about through a serendipitous meeting between Dene Ainsworth and Joe Tapara at the first-ever Māori men’s health conference, Tane Ora, held in Blenheim earlier this year.

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MAORI TV: Kelvin McMcdonald (left) & Ash Zoias.

Dene spoke about prostate cancer in a presentation at the conference and was heard by Joe Tapara.

The two talked about men’s health and prostate cancer and Joe told Dene that his presentation was needed on the Chatham Islands.

“I agreed that Chatham Islands men should have the same access and opportunity to these sorts of presentations as ‘mainland’ New Zealanders,” said Dene.

The trip, which was funded by the Prostate Cancer Foundation, was filmed by a crew from Maori Television, which will show it on its top current affairs programme, Native Affairs.

VIEW THE CHATHAM ISLANDS TRIP SLIDESHOW HERE

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US PROSTATE CANCER FOUNDATION: Proclamations like President Obama’s will help the US Prostate Cancer Foundation build awareness and support for finding better treatments and cures for prostate cancer. READ MORE>

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PROSTABLOG NZ:  A chance meeting between two Maori men may affect the future well-being of 135 males living on the Chatham Islands.

DENE AINSWORTH  (Dominion-Post picture)

DENE AINSWORTH DomPost pic

The meeting has led to a NZ Prostate Cancer Foundation-funded initiative, which will soon see the island’s over-40 male population offered health checks and prostate cancer screening tests.

More than half the island males have Maori and Moriori ancestry, and while they have no proven genetic pre-disposition, statistics show they are less likely to be diagnosed early, and suffer a death rate after diagnosis that is twice that for non-Maori.

Earlier this year, the Foundation helped Kapiti Coast man Dene Ainsworth get to Blenheim to attend Tane Ora, the first-ever Maori men’s health conference, so he could make a presentation.

One person who heard him was Joe Tapara, a representative of the Chatham Islands Māori Community Health.

Later, the pair talked about men’s health in general, and prostate cancer in particular, and Joe reckoned a talk along the lines of Dene’s presentation was needed on the Chathams.

“I agreed that Chatham Islands men should have same access and opportunity to these sorts of presentations as ‘mainland’ New Zealanders,” says Dene (Te Ati Awa), who is a prostate cancer survivor and now a member of the PCF Board.

He put the idea of a Chathams visit to the PCF in August and it was approved for the last weekend in September.

Dene will be accompanied by Napier urologist Dave Mason, who is donating his time and insists on paying his own travel costs, and who will offer free health checks to those men who want them.

The two will work with island health workers, and will be guided by their advice about the island’s needs.

chathamsMAP

According to the last census (2006), the 10-island Chatham Islands group (800 kilometres east of New Zealand) has a population of 609, whose ethnic origins are European (66%), Maori (57%) and Moriori (the first settlers).

Some 22% of the population (135) are men 40-plus, the milestone age when prostate cancer risks begin to rise.

The main island, Chatham, has a hospital and resident doctor, but no ready access to a specialist like Dave.

The islands are connected to NZ by regular air service, but fares cost many hundreds of dollars.

Julian-Wilcox

Julian Wilcox

Along to cover the trip will be Maori Television presenter Julian Wilcox, who will report it for the channel’s flagship current affairs programme, Native Affairs.

Also covering the three days – checkups by Dave and four presentations by Dene – will be Whitireia Journalism School student Carl Suurmond (Tainui), who will shoot video and still photos, and write articles.

Dene is Business Manager for a research and policy company, Mauriora-ki-te-Ao/Living Universe Ltd, which offers products and services that concern the development and communication of ideas, particularly as they relate to the creative potential of Māori knowledge, people and resources.

Owae Marae

Owae Marae

Dene: “Nō Waitara ahau, engari inaianei e noho ana ahau ki Ōtaki. Ānei toku pepeha: Ko tokomaru te waka, ko Taranaki te Maunga, ko Waitara te Awa, ko Te Āti Awa te iwi, ko Ngāti Rahiri te hapu, ko Owae te marae.

“I come from Waitara and am currently living in Otaki. I whakapapa to Te Āti Awa iwi and the hapu of Ngāti Rahiri and my turangawaewae (home place to stand) is Owae marae in Waitara.

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URO TODAY: More US men were diagnosed with prostate cancer at a younger age and earlier stage in 2004-2005 than in earlier years and the racial disparity in cancer stage at diagnosis has decreased statistically significantly over time. READ MORE>

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mohPROSTABLOG NZ: Maori and Pacific people living in NZ suffer big disparities in the way cancer is detected and treated, and how well they survive it. READ MORE>

This has been known for some time, but the problem is newly highlighted in the Ministry of Health-funded cancer guidelines for GPs that have just been released.

For example, it reminds us that as many as 17% of Maori cancer cases and 6% of deaths are never reported.

It also points out that health statistics tend to be five years old before they are published, which suggests that in the rapidly changing detection/treatment environment for prostate cancer, decision-making on how best to screen and treat is seriously hampered by lack of knowledge.

While the overall, 174-page report, avoids discussion of population-based screening, it does touch on the issue in the ethnicity section:

Cormack et al. noted that national screening programme data have identified that equitable screening for breast and cervical cancer has not been achieved for Mäori women.

However, BreastScreen South Limited’s results (70% of eligible Mäori women screened in 2005) suggest that the inclusion of focused efforts and leadership are the key to achieving equity in screening.

The report analyses available data on ethnic disparities in cancer detection and treatment, and makes a number of suggestions, including more “cultural competence” training for health workers.

For the full report, CLICK HERE>

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mohPROSTABLOG NZ: New guidelines for general practitioners on how to handle men presenting with possible symptoms of prostate cancer (and other cancers) were released today by the NZ Ministry of Health.  READ MORE> and HERE (summary)>

The advice is contained in a 174-page report from the Ministry-backed NZ Guidelines Group called Suspected Cancer in Primary Care – Guidelines for investigation, referral and reducing ethnic disparities, which sets out background data and guiding principles on a range of cancers.

The report avoids getting into population-based screening – a major issue in detecting prostate cancer – saying:

Cancer screening, health promotion and prevention, case-finding in asymptomatic people, recurrence of a previous cancer and metastatic cancer were beyond the guideline scope and therefore are not included.

However, it does relent a little in the section on ethnicity and cancer treatment disparity:

Addressing the issue of cancer screening is outside the broad scope of this guideline. However, because of the impact that screening uptake can potentially have on disease outcomes, it is briefly included as part of this disparity chapter.

In the section on prostate cancer, it outlines the following advice for GPs seeing patients:

  1. A man presenting with macroscopic haematuria (blood in urine) should be referred urgently to a specialist;
  2. A man found to have an enlarged, smooth prostate on digital rectal examination and a normal PSA should only be referred to a specialist if they have macroscopic haematuria;
  3. An older man presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms (frequency, hesitancy, nocturia) should be recommended to have a digital rectal examination and a PSA test.

Men with erectile dysfunction are excluded from the referral guidelines.

The report also contains the latest data on cancer trends and explores in some depth the detection, care and mortality disparities between Maori, Pacific people and European Kiwis.

On the page listing organisations that endorse the report (so presumably have seen it already), the Cancer Society of NZ (which opposes population-based prostate cancer screening) is included – but not the Prostate Cancer Foundation of NZ (which supports it).

The report comes just a week before the Government’s Parliamentary inquiry into prostate cancer detection and treatment, which will hear its first submissions on Wednesday.

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PROSTABLOG NZ: A new $20 million “Maori health innovations fund” has been announced by the Associate Minister of Health, Tariana Turia – but it makes no mention of one of the biggest killers of Maori men, prostate cancer.

The press release says:

The Fund is a significant step toward realising the aspirations of He Korowai Oranga (the Māori Health Strategy) and advancing whānau ora by supporting Māori service providers to develop and implement initiatives that effectively meet the health needs of whānau, hapū, iwi and their wider communities.

Over the next four years the Fund will invest a total of $20 million in the design, development, promotion and delivery of innovative whānau ora driven health services.

Check this site now for more information about the Māori Health Innovation Fund.

Download the Guide to Te Ao Auahatanga Hauora Māori from this site to find out more about application criteria and how your organisation might apply.

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URO TODAY: African American men have a less satisfactory experience than Caucasians when dealing with medical professionals over prostate cancer, a study of more than 1000 men has found. READ MORE>

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URO TODAY: Overall survival for African American advanced prostate cancer patients versus all other patients was 6% versus 9%, according to analysis of data involving nearly 20,000 US cancer patients treated between between 1974 and 2001. READ MORE>

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