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Archive for the ‘NZ Prostate Cancer Foundation’ Category

PROSTABLOG NZ: Nothing has been publicly announced so far as I know, but what has happened to NZ’s Mr Prostate Cancer?

Barry Young – long the voice of prostate cancer in this country – seems no longer to be president of  the Prostate Cancer Foundation, the organisation he steered for the last decade.

Go to the foundation’s website and you’ll see the president is now listed as Hawkes Bay lawyer Mark von Dadelszen.

Barry announced at the 2009 foundation AGM that he would be stepping down.

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CHATHAMS MESSAGE: The Maori TV and NZ Prostate Cancer Foundation team at Chatham Islands airport. Dene Ainsworth is second from left.

PROSTABLOG NZ: NZ’s Maori television channel has broadcast a beautifully produced programme on men and prostate cancer on the Chatham Islands.

It features Dene Ainsworth (Te Ati Awa), who goes to the remote islands, 800km east of NZ, with Hawkes Bay urologist Dave Mason to talk to people about the dangers of undetected prostate cancer.

Their visit was funded by the NZ Prostate Cancer Foundation. See the programme here:

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PROSTABLOG NZ: A minor matter for the record – as of today, the author of this blogsite, Jim Tucker, is no longer a member of the board of the Prostate Cancer Foundation of NZ.

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Chathams5PROSTABLOG NZ: A Chatham Island gale whips up the tail feathers on a passing Weka – but men on the island were far from ruffled by the visit of the NZ Prostate Cancer Foundation team last weekend.

They turned out in big numbers to hear the prostate cancer message from the team, whose visit to the island is being reported by Whitireia journalism student Carl Suurmond (who took these pictures). SEE PICTURES HERE>

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CHATHAMS WELCOME: Dene Ainsworth (white hair), urologist David Mason and his colleague arriving at Waitangi airport on Friday.

Carl tagged along with the foundation’s Dene Ainsworth, two Hawkes Bay urologists and a filmcrew from Maori TV, who all flew to the islands on Friday and were due back today.

The men spoke about the risks of prostate cancer to meetings organised by Chathams health worker Joe Tapara.

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WILD COAST: Carl Suurmond at Petre Bay, which forms half the main Chatham Island's west coast.

Here’s Carl’s first impressions:

Things are going well here, although the weather has not been the best (set to change to less rain tomorrow (Sunday).

Had to take advantage of a one-hour break in the rain and get some footage of the scenic reserve that is behind the lodge.  Amazing place. The people are really great, as well.

I passed on a boozy night at the local with some friendly young fishermen we met at the Kaingaroa Harbour Social Club, where we had a barbeque.

The presentations went well today, with a large turn out at Kaingaroa.  Good questions were asked and it seemed beneficial to all those who attended.

Dene has been great, and I admire his passion and enjoy his informative presentations where I have learnt a fair bit myself.

Maori Television has been doing a fair bit of filming and I have observed a few techniques.  Kelvin and Ash are really nice guys.

The Urology team from the Hawkes Bay, Dave(Mason) and Daniel, are also really great guys, who answer questions well and are fun to be around.

I’m not sure if there will be any testing, though. The PSA machine is here, but they say it hasn’t been trialled yet.

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One of the meeting venues.

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PROSTATE INQUIRY: One of Parliament's select committee rooms.

PROSTABLOG NZ: Mary and John -whose prostate cancer story appears on this website – will get their 15 minutes of fame tomorrow before the first hearing of the NZ Parliament’s inquiry into the disease.

Except they won’t be appearing before the Health Select Committee – they’ll be linked by teleconference hook-up.

John (real name Brian) is not well enough to fly from Auckland to the Capital city to be heard, so the committee has arranged the phone link from his and Mary’s (real name Kim) home.

They have been allotted a quarter of an hour tomorrow morning to tell the committee of parliamentarians about their struggle with Brian’s advanced cancer.

BarryYoung

BARRY YOUNG

The first day of hearings was originally set down for last Wednesday, but the House took urgency at short notice and everything else was cancelled.

Barry Young president of the Prostate Cancer Foundation of NZ, will be among those presenting submissions tomorrow morning.

It’s not clear at this stage whether PCF board member Mark Von Dadelszen, a Napier lawyer who was originally scheduled to speak tomorrow, will now get a slot.

I will be attending tomorrow to report the event for this blogsite, as well as NZ Doctor magazine.

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PROSTABLOG NZ:  A chance meeting between two Maori men may affect the future well-being of 135 males living on the Chatham Islands.

DENE AINSWORTH  (Dominion-Post picture)

DENE AINSWORTH DomPost pic

The meeting has led to a NZ Prostate Cancer Foundation-funded initiative, which will soon see the island’s over-40 male population offered health checks and prostate cancer screening tests.

More than half the island males have Maori and Moriori ancestry, and while they have no proven genetic pre-disposition, statistics show they are less likely to be diagnosed early, and suffer a death rate after diagnosis that is twice that for non-Maori.

Earlier this year, the Foundation helped Kapiti Coast man Dene Ainsworth get to Blenheim to attend Tane Ora, the first-ever Maori men’s health conference, so he could make a presentation.

One person who heard him was Joe Tapara, a representative of the Chatham Islands Māori Community Health.

Later, the pair talked about men’s health in general, and prostate cancer in particular, and Joe reckoned a talk along the lines of Dene’s presentation was needed on the Chathams.

“I agreed that Chatham Islands men should have same access and opportunity to these sorts of presentations as ‘mainland’ New Zealanders,” says Dene (Te Ati Awa), who is a prostate cancer survivor and now a member of the PCF Board.

He put the idea of a Chathams visit to the PCF in August and it was approved for the last weekend in September.

Dene will be accompanied by Napier urologist Dave Mason, who is donating his time and insists on paying his own travel costs, and who will offer free health checks to those men who want them.

The two will work with island health workers, and will be guided by their advice about the island’s needs.

chathamsMAP

According to the last census (2006), the 10-island Chatham Islands group (800 kilometres east of New Zealand) has a population of 609, whose ethnic origins are European (66%), Maori (57%) and Moriori (the first settlers).

Some 22% of the population (135) are men 40-plus, the milestone age when prostate cancer risks begin to rise.

The main island, Chatham, has a hospital and resident doctor, but no ready access to a specialist like Dave.

The islands are connected to NZ by regular air service, but fares cost many hundreds of dollars.

Julian-Wilcox

Julian Wilcox

Along to cover the trip will be Maori Television presenter Julian Wilcox, who will report it for the channel’s flagship current affairs programme, Native Affairs.

Also covering the three days – checkups by Dave and four presentations by Dene – will be Whitireia Journalism School student Carl Suurmond (Tainui), who will shoot video and still photos, and write articles.

Dene is Business Manager for a research and policy company, Mauriora-ki-te-Ao/Living Universe Ltd, which offers products and services that concern the development and communication of ideas, particularly as they relate to the creative potential of Māori knowledge, people and resources.

Owae Marae

Owae Marae

Dene: “Nō Waitara ahau, engari inaianei e noho ana ahau ki Ōtaki. Ānei toku pepeha: Ko tokomaru te waka, ko Taranaki te Maunga, ko Waitara te Awa, ko Te Āti Awa te iwi, ko Ngāti Rahiri te hapu, ko Owae te marae.

“I come from Waitara and am currently living in Otaki. I whakapapa to Te Āti Awa iwi and the hapu of Ngāti Rahiri and my turangawaewae (home place to stand) is Owae marae in Waitara.

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BLUE BRANDING: Members of the Prostate Cancer Foundation with balloons used by a marketing company to explain the new Blue September fundraiser.

AUGUST 1: PROSTABLOG NZ: A new executive committee to run the Prostate Cancer Foundation of NZ (PCF) was elected by 50 PCF members at their annual meeting in Napier.

Long-time president Barry Young, Thames, was re-elected for his sixth term, after a secret ballot when he was challenged by Hamilton member Peter Forman.

Young’s wife, Carolyn Young (pictured with Barry), stepped down as long-serving Foundation secretary and was replaced unopposed by Ian Hedley of Orewa.

Dinner Barry & CarolynTwo vice-presidents were elected – Dunedin’s Keith Beck, who also runs the PCF website, and long-serving Foundation treasurer Trevor Green, Auckland.

The new executive committee elected by secret ballot from 13 candidates will comprise Dene Ainsworth (Porirua), Ian Chapman (Nelson), Mark von Dadelszen (Havelock North), Nicholas Jack (Auckland) and Prostablog author Jim Tucker (Wellington).

After a surplus of $1.83 million in the financial year to March 31, 2008, the Foundation lost $136,688 in the last financial year.

The main reason was a severing of ties with the Australian-owned Movember fund-raising campaign, which gave last November’s takings to the Cancer Society and others rather than PCF. The 2007 Movember had helped PCF boost its income by more than $2 million.

No money came from fund-raising last year, although the Foundation made $424,672 from donations and memberships ($268,934), interest on investments ($148,255) and other sources.

Despite the loss of Movember (which criticised the PCF for not appearing to use the money it handed over), the Foundation is still in a strong financial position, with total equity of more than $2.5 million (compared with about $3 million the year before). It has most of its money conservatively invested with the ASB Bank.

AGMtoptableSome at the annual meeting were critical of the lack of detail in the balance sheet, but treasurer Trevor Green said the auditors passed the accounts and they were presented to the meeting in the form prepared by the organisation’s accountants.

President Barry gave an assurance than more detailed accounts would be made available as soon as possible. This had not happened in time for the annual meeting.

The auditors, WHK Gosling Chapman, who completed their audit two days before the annual meeting on July 25, made the following comments about the accounts:

Control over revenues from donations and membership income prior to being recorded is limited and there are no practical audit procedures to determine the effect of this limited control.

In this respect alone we have not obtained all the information and explanations that we have required.

In our opinion, except for the adjustments that might have been found to be necessary had we been able to obtain sufficient evidence concerning donations and membership income

  • proper accounting records have been kept by the foundation as far as appears from our examination of those records; and
  • the financial statements on pages 3 to 8 comply with generally accepted accounting practice; give a true and fair view of the financial position of the foundation as at 31 March, 2009 and the results of its operations for the year ended on that date.

AGMcrowd

No budget for the coming year was presented to the meeting.

Barry Young said in his annual report the PCF had had a “most interesting” year, but had emerged as a “more mature organisation better equipped to meet its future obligations”.

It had been affected by the recession, but conservative policies meant it was protected from losses on investments.

“Lower bank interest rates have been the cause of main concern and with commitments to projects (including research) reserves have been reduced.

“Care needs to be taken to maintain reserves at a level where they provide adequate return to enable the Foundation to fulfill the role now expected of it.”

The Foundation continued its financial support of a project seeking markers of biological behaviour in prostate cancer tumours, having given $153,000 over two years.

“Other applications for funding have been postponed until the financial situation clarifies,” he told the meeting.

The PCF funded a project in Palmerston North involving health checks for 100 men and the results of analysis were received two days before the meeting, not leaving enough time for him to absorb and relay them.

In answer to a question from the floor, he said the Foundation would be making submissions to the upcoming inquiry into prostate cancer screening by Parliament’s Health Select Committee. These were being prepared by the organisation’s medical committee in time for the submission deadline of August 21.

The PCF has embarked on a replacement fund-raising campaign called Blue September, which was outlined to the meeting by the NZ representatives of an Australian marketing company called MWC Media.

The representatives showed charts indicating that sponsors lined up for the campaign this year would donate about $150,000.

One, Watties, has agreed to produce a line of baked beans in cans coloured the foundation’s new blue.

Other ideas came forward from the floor of the meeting, including Lin Tucker’s suggestion the foundation should persuade a prophylactic company to make blue condoms.

The Blue September re-branding has so far cost the PCF $168,000.

The PCF has 329 paid-up members and active local branch organisations in Whangarei, North Harbour, South Auckland, Hamilton, Tauranga, New Plymouth, Gisborne, Hawkes Bay, Wairarapa, Mana, Otaki, Wellington, Nelson, Canterbury, Dunedin and Southland. An organiser has been found to set up branches in Auckland.

Early in the meeting, members saw brief extracts from the first two DVDs of a series on prostate cancer being made by veteran TV producer Robert Boyd-Bell. Featuring top urologists, the videos are being progressively posted on the Foundation’s website.

The meeting was followed by a dinner:

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ABOVE: Executive Committee member Dene Ainsworth (left) in serious discussion with immediate past Vice-President Ans Parder, Christchurch.

Dinner Ian Chapman

ABOVE: Ian Chapman, Nelson, who was re-elected to the executive committee.

Dinner Ian Morrieson

ABOVE: Doreen and Ian Morrison, who run the foundation’s branch in Mana north of Wellington.

DinnerGeneral

ABOVE: Prostablog blogger Jim Tucker (bald, at left) in conversation with Jan Ainsworth.

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JULY 25: PROSTABLOG NZ:  Barry Young, long-serving president of the NZ Prostate Cancer Foundation, was re-elected for his sixth term today, but this may be his last.

Barry, who has been involved with the foundation for a decade and has become known as its media figurehead, says he will be stepping down as foundation CEO, but will continue as president for at least another year to ensure continuity.

About 50 people attended the foundation’s annual meeting in Napier today, electing a new executive committee.

The meeting got a first look at a new series of DVDs on prostate cancer, fronted by prominent urologists Robin Smart and Peter Davison, and featuring celebrity patients like broadcaster Paul Holmes, as well as former All Black captain Buck Shelford, who suffered a different form of cancer but who campaigns on behalf of Maori men who suffer prostate cancer.

The series explains all aspects of prostate cancer screening and treatment and is now available on the foundation’s website.

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Barry Young at today’s prostate cancer foundation AGM showing Lin Tucker one of the balloons – coloured blue to match the organisation’s new fund-raising brand, Blue September – used in a marketing demonstration.

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JULY 17: PROSTABLOG NZ: We’ve arrived!

Prostablog has been “adopted” by the Prostate Cancer Foundation of New Zealand as its blog and there is now a link to us from the foundation’s website.

PCF

It’s been a good week for Prostablog in other ways: on Wednesday we had 225 hits, our biggest ever readership since the site began on April 1.

Page loads now average about 150 a day, not counting those who have an RSS feed (not counted by StatCounter).

The site has had 8385 hits in its two and a half months.

This is the 599th post.

The biggest readership is from the US (about 45%), while NZ viewers make up between 25% and 30%. The chart below shows where some of the last 2000 hits came from (the chart on StatCounter is much longer than this):

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