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Archive for the ‘PROSTATE CANCER’ Category

Hi all

I haven’t been on this blog for a while, so apologies to anyone who has commented or asked questions.

I am teaching blogging to my journalism students today and showed them Prostablog – and discovered a large number of pending comments. They are mostly now posted (apart from the spam ones).

The reason I have stayed away, I guess, is I consider myself prostate cancer-free these days. My PSA doesn’t register, and my checks are down to once a year.

It is three and a half years since the surgery to remove my prostate and while I still have to get to the five year post, then a decade, I don’t think much about it.

Please take that as a positive – it could be seen as selfish on my part not to continue blogging. However,  I just ran out of stuff to say, and monitoring the web for prostate cancer news was taking several hours a day, which I now need to spend on doing other stuff.

I’m 66 and have just retired from journalism teaching. I will be returning to my hometown of New Plymouth in Taranaki to finish a book and maybe write some others. I will be working with my brother, photographer Rob Tucker, who has a few projects for me to contribute some writing to.

Prostate cancer changed my life in one important way: my wife and I enjoy camping, so decided to abandon home ownership in favour of a big caravan, which we tow around the country.

Although it might seem a crazy option in mid-winter, in fact we are finding it a great lifestyle at any time of year. Even the cat has got used to moving around.

So there we are. I feel lucky. Here’s all the best to all of you just starting the journey I began on Christmas Eve, 2008.

If you want to discuss anything about prostate cancer with me, please use my gmail address: edwardtuckr001@gmail.com

But remember, I’m not following the topic closely any more, so may not be able to help. And my advice is always cautious – I’m not a doctor, and I believe every man’s experience is different and personal.

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BUSINESSWIRE: With a recent first-of-its-kind surgery, physicians at Mayo Clinic in Arizona have developed a new surgical procedure for the treatment of prostate cancer using natural orifices – signalling the next step in the evolution of minimally invasive surgery. READ MORE>

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WEB MED: More than 75% of men diagnosed with low-risk prostate cancer undergo aggressive treatment — either complete removal of the prostate or radiation therapy, according to a new study.

That’s true, the researchers found, even in men with a low level of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) of under 4 nanograms per milliliter, one of the factors taken into account when treatment decisions are made. READ MORE>

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URO TODAY: Korean researchers have found there is no evidence to support a harmful effect of coffee consumption on prostate cancer risk. READ MORE>

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US ARMY TIMES:  Service members tend to have higher rates of melanoma, brain, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, breast, prostate and testicular cancers than civilians. READ MORE>

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URO TODAY: Knowing exactly where in the prostate a biopsy sample has come from is a problem for those diagnosing the disease, but scientists may have found a way to improve that by combining MRI scans with needle biopsy. READ MORE>

It is feasible to document the location of transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsies on pre-procedure MRI by fusing the pre-procedure TRUS to an endorectal coil MRI using electromagnetic needle tracking.

This procedure may be useful in documenting the location of prior biopsies, improving quality control and thereby avoiding under-sampling of the prostate, as well as directing subsequent biopsies to regions of the prostate not previously sampled.

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WALL ST JOURNAL: Scientists may soon be able to answer the agonising question facing men with prostate cancer: Does their cancer need immediate treatment or can it be left alone? READ MORE>

AND: Some men with low Gleason scores have cancer that spreads quickly, while some with high scores don’t. READ MORE>

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