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Archive for the ‘Cancer aggression’ Category

AUGUST 4: URO TODAY: A new UK study may have implications on understanding pathways of prostate cancer progression and on identifying potential targets for screening – pending further investigation of associations between PSA testing, Gleason score, and cancer stage. READ MORE>

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JULY 4: URO TODAY: US researchers claim to have developed a patient-specific, biology-driven tool to predict outcome at the time of prostate cancer diagnosis. READ MORE>

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JUNE 19: NEW PROSTATE CANCER INFOLINK: One of the major issues in the management of prostate cancer is the identification of early physical (as opposed to biochemical) evidence of metastatic disease. READ MORE>

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JUNE 13: NEW PROSTATE CANCER INFO-LINK: According to a report today on NJ.com, there are suggestions that defective  “autophagy” — the process through which a cell “self-digests” because of the action of enzymes originating within the same cell — may be crucial to the amount and aggressiveness of at least some cancers. Prostate cancer may be one of those types of cancer. READ MORE>

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JUNE 13: URO TODAY: WAVE3 is pivotal in controlling the invasiveness of prostate cancer cells, according to a new study at Cardiff University School of Medicine in the UK .

Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome verprolin-homologous 3 (WAVE3) belongs to Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome family proteins, which, along with other members, play a critical role in the regulation of actin polymerization and cell motility. We investigated the expression pattern and the effects of manipulating endogenous WAVE3 expression in prostate cancer cells.

Further work is needed to assess WAVE3 as a potential marker for predicting tumour aggressiveness. READ MORE>

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JUNE 12: HEALTH CARE BLOG: Researchers have found that although hormone therapy helps prevent growth of the prostate cancer, the treatment also changes its properties, thereby making the tumour more aggressive. READ MORE>

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JUNE 10: BAYLOR COLLEGE: The extent of change to stroma – the supportive framework of the prostate gland – caused by prostate cancer may be an indication of disease aggression, say researchers at Baylor College of Medicine in a report that appears in the current issue of the journal Clinical Cancer Research. READ MORE>

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