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Posts Tagged ‘Urination’

PROSTABLOG NZ: My last PSA test recently showed it continues to be undetectable, some 20 months after my surgery in March, 2009.

But I’m not getting cocky just yet (forgive the pun).

From what I’ve read about prostate cancer treatment, if the cancer bug has got out of the organ during/after a prostatectomy, there’s a good chance the first signs will come two years after the operation.

My two-year anniversary comes up in a couple of months – so wish me luck.

It’s interesting how long it takes to fully recover from the surgery’s effects.

My scar is virtually gone and I’ve felt fit for ages.

There’s no incontinence. I haven’t done the pelvic floor exercises for more than a year, but there’s never any problem with not being able to hold it in, even when I’m busting.

Not that I put myself in the busting mode if I can avoid it.

So, hey, no regrets and no real worries. I’m bloody lucky.

Well, there is one worry – the number of friends and people I know who have been diagnosed. Talk about an epidemic.

And I wonder if the NZ Parliamentary Health Select Committee will ever get round to reporting back on its prostate cancer inquiry…

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URO TODAY: Men having a biopsy for prostate cancer need to be warned that it will temporarily affect urination and may also have an impact on erectile function, a German study says. READ MORE>

Prostate biopsy causes impaired voiding (of the bladder).

Saturation (20-core) prostate biopsy and periprostatic nerve block seem to have a lasting impact on voiding function.

Erectile function is transiently affected by prostate biopsy regardless of periprostatic nerve block and the number of cores.

Patients who undergo prostate biopsy must be informed about these side effects.

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URO TODAY: Recent changes in male sling surgery may improve efficacy in men with more severe incontinence. READ MORE>

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URO TODAY: Benign prostatic hyperplasia patients in whom prostate cancer is suspected and who have urination problems, with a previously negative biopsy result, can undergo transurethral resection of the prostate, which treats bladder outlet obstruction and gives early diagnosis of prostate cancer. READ MORE>

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URO TODAY: Dogs can be trained to correctly identify certain prostate cancer cell-derived volatile organic compounds in urine, according to new data from researchers in Paris. READ MORE>

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RENAL & UROLOGY NEWS: Prostate cancer is associated with substantially diminished urinary health, new research shows. READ MORE>

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PROSTABLOG NZ: At last – somebody’s taken up the cudgels over my You Tube “live streaming” incident.

Here’s popular Stuff blogger Luke Appleby’s take on big brother You Tube and how heavily it wields its censorship club.

It seems Prostablog is not the only user to feel the sharp end of You Tube’s “community guidelines”.

Read Luke’s Connector blog HERE>

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PROSTABLOG NZ:  Well, here’s something good for a chuckle – my short video (right) showing improved urine stream after prostate surgery has just been taken down by You Tube.

Here’s what they say:

The following video(s) from your account have been disabled for violating the YouTube Community Guidelines:

  • Stream – (Tuckr001)

Your account has received one Community Guidelines warning sanction, which will expire in six months. Additional violations may result in the temporary disabling of your ability to post content to YouTube and/or the termination of your account.

Sincerely,

The YouTube Team

So, I’m on notice for offending good taste, I guess.

I’d love to know who complained.

Here’s my response to You Tube (be interesting to see what they say):

I have received your message with some alarm.
The video clip you refer to is a serious attempt to illustrate to men recovering from the effects of prostate cancer surgery the results such surgery have on improving urine flow.
I refer you to the blog on which this video appears. From that, hopefully, you will see the context.
To remove the video for reasons that can only be imagined shows that You Tube has little understanding of the purpose of such an item.
I request that you restore it as soon as possible.
I await your reply with interest, and will report it on the blog.
Here’s the link to my blog (which has so far received 52,000 page uploads and much favourable comment from prostate cancer sufferers and medical experts): http://prostablog.wordpress.com
Thank you

Having read the community guidelines, I’m at a loss to know where the video trangresses. Take a read (see the link above) and let me know what you think.

Here’s where the original video appeared in my series, My PC Adventure: CLICK HERE

I have to say that the video has already been through the scrutiny of the toughest censor of all, my wife Lin, who cut the length (of the video) to a short few seconds. Since she apporoved it, who could possibly take offence?

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catheter2

ME and my catheter.

PROSTABLOG NZ: More on catheters.

An English industrial design student called Sam Gough has been in touch to ask if he can use my account of having a catheter after surgery last March (see Comments).

Sam is researching medical equipment and is interested in the catheter.

If any of you have stories to tell about this indispensable – but seemingly at times devilish – piece of kit, please contact him at: samgough23@hotmail.com

I recounted a couple of negative anecdotes about catheters in last night’s blog, so perhaps I need to balance it with others that aren’t quite so downside.

One mate who went through radical prostatectomy a year before I did said it was a handy bit of gear: “You could go to the pub and just piss the beer straight through.”

He was surely joking, and it was probably just an attempt to allay my fears.

Another said: “Ah, the catheter…you’ll grow to love your catheter.” More irony, I guess.

Barry Young, president of the NZ Prostate Cancer Foundation told me that when he was recovering from surgery 10 years ago he had his catheter removed after a week or so, as you do, but then had recurring incidents of not being able to pee.

It would happen at the most inopportune times, so he had to learn to insert a catheter tube on himself.

Imagine that! After all, for some of us, the damned thing is put in place when we’re under anaesthetic, so we can only look and marvel later at how such a bloody big thick piece of tubing can be introduced to what you always imagine is a such narrow space.

Incidentally, Barry had the problem only temporarily. He has been fully recovered for 10 years, and probably – like all good boaties who suffer hell in a storm then quickly forget about it in the safe haven of harbour – now has trouble remembering the details. Maybe not.

The growing-to-love-your-catheter comment came back to haunt me straight after my surgery, when Bob Hale, the highly professional urology nurse at Wellington Hospital, came to see me in the recovery ward.

I made a gauche comment about “loving my catheter” and he looked at me sternly: “Having a catheter is one of the most uncomfortable experiences a man can have,” he said.

Bob turned out to be anything but stern. He was the one who took the tube out later and he did such a great job I felt no discomfort at all.

One more catheter anecdote: I have an old friend who, nearing 80, was admitted to Auckland Hospital with urinary problems and was discovered to have a very enlarged prostate. He had a catheter inserted for temporary relief and surgery was advised.

His response: no way. And he still has the catheter – a year later.

He truly loves his catheter.

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catheter3PROSTABLOG NZ: What is it about the catheter?

Whenever I look at the viewer statistics for Prostablog, there’s one thing that stands out: “catheter” is the most popular search word people use when they find their way to this site.

It beats everything else by a country mile.

Yesterday, for instance, there were 27 instances of the word being searched – while the next most popular occured seven times.

Today, it’s the same – so far 13 searches on “catheter”, with “Mick Jagger” scoring three (God knows why?) and “brachytherapy and impotence” getting two.

It’s been like this ever since the blog started in April.

I’m not sure I understand how search engines work, but there seems to be a message here: us blokes are very, very worried about getting that damned tube shoved up our tackle.

I can understand why. It was my biggest single fear of the whole radical prostatectomy process.

I needn’t have worried, as it turned out, because the male urology nurse at Wellington Hospital did a brilliant job of removing it. I honestly didn’t feel a thing.

However, two male acquaintances haven’t been so lucky. They both say it was excrutiating. Both had female nurses (is there something significant here? Surely not…) do the removal.

One guy had his taken out just last month and in his words “she just ripped it out.”

How common are such stories? Do they account for the general fear men seem to have about the catheter?

Perhaps someone could write in and enlighten me. All I know is, the term brings a lot of traffic to this blogsite.

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