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Archive for the ‘AFTER EFFECTS’ Category

REUTERS: Men who show signs that their disease has returned after prostate cancer treatment are still more likely to die of other causes, a new study in US veterans shows. READ MORE>

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URO TODAY: A numb penis is a rare complication from brachytherapy for prostate cancer, but it can be fixed. READ MORE>

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TV3 NEWS:  Most prostate operations should be replaced with kinder treatments because although surgery is a lifesaver, the side effects are dismal, says a visiting expert on prostate cancer who reckons the sex lives of New Zealand men are being ruined unnecessarily. READ MORE>

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SYDNEY MORNING HERALD: Many doctors play down the possible side effects of prostate cancer treatment on men’s sex lives, for fear they’ll be scared off, a world leader in the field has told an international conference on the Gold Coast. READ MORE>

And HERE>

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NEW PROSTATE CANCER INFOLINK:  How often after prostate surgery should a “low risk” patient have his PSA tested to check if the cancer is coming back? READ MORE>

Tollefson et al. conclude that,  in low-risk patients, the risk of biochemical failure is inversely proportional to time for which the PSA is undetectable after radical prostatectomy.

They go on to suggest that taking PSA levels every two years should be sufficient to identify the majority of low-risk patients who experience biochemical progression.

The “New” Prostate Cancer InfoLink would certainly agree that annual PSA testing is probably unnecessary in the majority of patients who are treated surgically for low-risk disease if their PSA is undetectable after surgery.

However, the key question is how long should annual PSA testing be carried out before the patient can be switched to testing every two (or perhaps even every three) years.

Based on this paper, it would seem likely that even low-risk patients should all receive at least annual testing for three years after surgery.

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URO TODAY: New drugs – still being trialled – are proving effective treatment of prostate cancer bone metastases and prevention of fractures associated with androgen deprivation therapy. READ MORE>

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URO TODAY: One in five men have a DNA variation that increases the risk of prostate cancer recurring after surgery, even though other factors (early diagnosis, low aggression, etc) may be in their favour. READ MORE> and HERE>

Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, US:
The A/G genotype of rs10895304 is predictive of decreased recurrence-free survival in patients with clinically localised prostate cancer.

Our data suggest that for this subset of patients, prostatectomy alone may not be adequate for local control.

This is a novel and relevant marker that should be evaluated for improved risk stratification of patients who may be candidates for adjuvant radiation therapy to improve local control.

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URO TODAY: Acupuncture provides excellent control of hot flashes in men undergoing androgen ablation therapy (hormone treatment) for prostate cancer, according to US researchers. READ MORE>

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URO TODAY: Prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiation who are still having urinary/gastrointestinal problems two months after treatment are more likely to have long-term side effects. READ MORE>

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URO TODAY: Men undergoing prostate surgery have a higher risk of later developing a penis-deforming condition called Peyronie’s disease. READ MORE>

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