Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘My story’ Category

I should be cracking a bottle of fine bubbles about now – I’m more than a decade past my prostatectomy and there are no signs of Prostate cancer.

is it tempting fate to write that? Of course it is. I met someone a year or so back who got to 13 years with no show of C…then he got it.

Unusual, that. A decade was considered the magic milestone when I was writing about prostate cancer regularly (the first couple of years after my op). What is it now, I wonder? Is there even a safe zone any more? I’d rather not know.

The only time I think about it is when I hear from someone looking for a bit of advice and encouragement. Or when I look down at my greatly shortened appendage, the result of having your urinary tract sliced to get rid of the prostate and sewn back together again.

Nobody warns you about that. After the scars have all but disappeared, a short dick is just about all that’s left to remind you of the op. Small price to pay for life, of course, but irritating, nonetheless.

My wife, bless her, says she doesn’t even notice (she just said something indecent I can’t repeat here – yes, that function still works, too).

I do notice another change, but I suspect it’s the result of creeping age (I’m 73 now); my flow has slowed up considerably again.

I will never forget the joy of taking a slash once the op wounds healed and marvelling at the flow of an 18-year-old that cascaded into the bowl.

I was so excited at the time (2010) I shot a short video (no appendage in view) and posted it on this blog. Weirdly, some sicko complained to WordPress after a few months and they took it down. Give me strength.

Anyway, all is well. Look out for yourselves during Covid.

FOOTNOTE: Just cracked a bottle of fine bubbles with Lin, not just to celebrate the clear decade, but we just finished our latest book (my 21st).

 

Read Full Post »

The surgeon who removed my prostate back in early 2009 reckoned I could count myself probably clear if I went a decade without any signs the cancer had spread. 

So far as I know, it hasn’t. I have an annual PSA test and it’s always next to nothing, but since it never budged before I was diagnosed in late 2008 I don’t quite trust it as a sure sign. There are no other indications, however, so it all seems good.

I did get a heart scare over summer, but an exploration of my main arteries showed no sign of trouble. Turned out it was the result of a nasty virus. All good now.

My peeing is a bit slower sometimes, but I can still go eight hours of sleeping at night without having to get up for a visit to the loo. Unless I’ve had a few beers (but I’ve switched to low alcohol beer and don’t drink wine any more, so no problems there).

In terms of “performance”, everything works just fine (and a lot less messily, if you get my drift). I finally got used to the loss of a few centimetres.

At 71, I feel fit and well, and don’t ever think much about the lucky escape from prostate cancer. I hope plenty of readers of this blog have the same outcome.

Read Full Post »

Oops – a bit of a scare.

I needed a urine test last week when I thought I’d picked up an infection in the waterworks; it showed no infection – but traces of blood.

Minute traces. I hadn’t noticed anything, but I had been a bit sore in the pipework, possibly connected to unusually (for me these days) prolonged…how can I put this delicately…relations.

I was sure that’s all it was, but my GP ordered another test of the urine, for red blood corpuscles. RBC in doctor’s shorthand.

Coupled with the fact we’d neglected to include PSA in my annual bloodtests last November, this news certainly sent a shiver down the spine.

Here I am nearly seven years down the track from a prostatectomy and so far clear of prostate cancer, and thinking nothing can go wrong now. Surely.

That’s foolish, of course. When I last checked, the medical authorities were saying you need to be clear at least a decade.

I peed in the polystyrene cup on Monday morning, the GP’s nurse decanted a sample into a phial, wrote the paperwork, and sent me off to the lab to hand it in.

Then, the wait. How long before they ring with the result?

Nothing by Thursday. So I rang. The GP’s nurse told me to hang on while she checked. It took forever, it seemed, but was only a couple of minutes.

Then: “You’re clear. Nothing was found.”

Big phew. Gigantic phew.

Why hadn’t they called? My wife says GPs don’t these days, if the news is good. Only if it’s bad.

How considerate.

Read Full Post »

imageJust had another routine PSA test and the result is negative again.

That means I have how been clear of prostate cancer for six years. Life is good.

I am now meant to be retired, but approaching the age of 68 I find my work as a freelance writer, editor, photographer and journalist is as busy as ever.

I published my latest book – on how my home province of Taranaki in NZ has cleaned up its many rivers – in October last year. The next book, about a pioneering Taranaki family, is nearly ready to go to the publisher.

In my spare time, I write the occasional indepth article for a local magazine called Live.

Check out my work at: JimTuckerMedia

 

Read Full Post »