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Archive for the ‘Treatment debate’ Category

PR NEWSWIRE: The four main prostate cancer treatment options have similar outcomes – the complications differ vastly, the recent American Urological Association annual conference heard.

The best advice for men and their partners? Don’t take the word of one doctor (who may only know about his/her own speciality). Get more than one opinion and go to the web and do your own research. READ MORE> and HERE>

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URO TODAY: UK men who used an internet site called Prosdex to help them decide on prostate cancer treatment made more informed decisions. READ MORE>

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URO TODAY: Men choosing treatment for prostate cancer tend to consider 11 different factors – and neglect two of them: recommendations from friends and relatives, and the after-effects of treatment on daily activities. READ MORE>

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URO TODAY: You’re a “low risk” prostate cancer patient – what treatment do you choose?

A panel of three doctors – expert in active surveillance, surgery and radio therapy – look at a 62-year-old with Gleason 6, 2/12 positive biopsy samples, small volume, PSA 0.09 and good sexual function. READ MORE>

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NEW PROSTATE CANCER INFO-LINK: Surgery was the preferred prostate cancer treatment option for three out of five men surveyed at three US urology clinics. READ MORE>

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NEW PROSTATE CANCER INFOLINK: A trial to see whether double hormone therapy for prostate cancer is better than using a single androgen blockade is not expected to report until 2013, so meantime “you are going to have to rely on your own research and a discussion with your doctor”. READ MORE>

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NEW PROSTATE CANCER INFOLINK: Evidence is growing that active surveillance – watchful waiting – is a viable option for men diagnosed with prostate cancer, but more long-term data is needed on survival rates. READ MORE>

“…these data – indicating that just 51 (11%) of 470 men in the Johns Hopkins active surveillance series have gone on to have a radical prostatectomy within roughly a 3-year follow-up period – continue to offer strong evidence of the potential of this management technique.

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