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Posts Tagged ‘benign prostatic hyperplasia’

MEDICAL NEWS TODAY: The boom in cancer biomarker investments over the past 25 years has not translated into major clinical success. READ MORE>

The reasons for biomarker failures include problems with study design and interpretation, as well as statistical deficiencies, according to an article in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

if the biomarker is affected by a non-cancer disease, its utility for cancer detection may be compromised. For example, the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) biomarker, which is used to detect prostate cancer, is also elevated in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

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URO TODAY: Benign prostatic hyperplasia patients in whom prostate cancer is suspected and who have urination problems, with a previously negative biopsy result, can undergo transurethral resection of the prostate, which treats bladder outlet obstruction and gives early diagnosis of prostate cancer. READ MORE>

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BIO-MEDICINE: The first patients have entered a Phase 2 clinical trial of a innovative targeted drug treatment, Aptocine(TM) (talaporfin sodium), for benign prostatic hyperplasia (enlarged prostate). READ MORE>

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JULY 18: URO TODAY: In incontinence treatment called ProACT is a less invasive treatment compared to the standard artificial urinary sphincter, the male sling and bulk injections, a Dutch study shows. READ MORE>

Adjustable Continence Therapy (ProACT™) from Uromedica, Inc, is a minimally invasive urological implant designed to treat male patients who have stress urinary incontinence arising from intrinsic sphincter deficiency following radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer or transurethral resection of the prostate for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

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JUNE 20: URO TODAY: Men undergoing surgical interventions for benign enlarged prostate are still at risk for subsequent development of prostate cancer due to residual tissue. READ MORE>

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BIO-MEDICINE: Dutasteride (Avodart), a commonly prescribed drug to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia, has been shown to lower the risk of prostate cancer by 23 percent in men with an increased risk of the disease, according to results of an international clinical trial presented yesterday at the American Urological Association annual meeting in Chicago. READ MORE>

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