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Posts Tagged ‘cancer survival rates’

DAILY MAIL: UK Researchers studied the number of cancer survivors living up to 10 years after being diagnosed with the disease and the result is the country’s first ever “cancer map” which breaks down survival rates. READ MORE>

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PROSTABLOG NZ: The survival rate for prostate cancer patients in NZ increased more than 12% in the seven years to 2006, according to the Ministry of Health. READ MORE>

The prostate cancer survival gain is the best of five major cancer sites (prostate, breast, coloectal, cervical and lung), says the Ministry’s annual report released this week.

Maori continue to show poor results.

On cancer survival, the report says:

Cancer survival is a key outcome measure of cancer control and provides useful insights into the effectiveness of health care in detecting and treating cancer. Five-year cancer survival rates are a direct measure of the effectiveness of the health system in treating cancer.

The five-year relative survival rate has increased for all five major cancer sites.

This increase was in the region of 5–6 percent for colorectal, breast and cervical cancers and over 12 percent for prostate cancer in the seven years since 1997/98.

The survival rate for lung cancer is significantly less than for other cancer sites and has improved the least.

Survival graph

Ethnic minorities

Five-year relative survival rates show Maori at a marked disadvantage compared with the non-Maori/non-Pacific ethnic group for five selected cancer sites.

Of all ethnic groups, Pacific people show the lowest relative survival rates for female breast and cervical cancers.

Efforts to increase the number of Pacific women being screened through cancer screening programmes should help to identify greater numbers of women in need of cancer treatment in the future.

Maori survival

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JULY 8: WALL STREET JOURNAL:  President Obama may be pushing the US towards a “medical-rationing” system like that in the UK, administered by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence, or NICE. This will have consequences:

The Concord study published in 2008 showed that cancer survival rates in Britain are among the worst in Europe. Five-year survival rates among US cancer patients are also significantly higher than in Europe: 84% vs. 73% for breast cancer, 92% vs. 57% for prostate cancer. While there is more than one reason for this difference, surely one is medical innovation (discouraged by the NICE approach) and the greater US willingness to re-imburse for it.  READ MORE>

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