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BarryYoungJUNE 22: PROSTABLOG NZ: For many years New Zealand men have refused to accept the lack of a formal screening programme for prostate cancer and have opted for self-requested screening, says NZ Prostate Cancer Foundation president Barry Young (right).

“Without screening programmes, New Zealand men have taken the initiative and established their own,” he says in a statement released to Prostablog NZ. today.

“Nearly 3000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year and about 600 die of it, so you can see the scale of what is happening.

“We are hopeful that the recently announced Health Select Committee inquiry will decide to change this and create a formal prostate cancer screening programme.

“It is every man’s right to know what is happening within his body and to decide for himself whether he should be treated for a disease or not.

“This is particularly the case with prostate cancer, which can be developing within a man’s body without him knowing about it.

“What men have to realise is that in its early stages prostate cancer doesn’t usually exhibit symptoms and when symptoms do occur it is usually too late for effective curative treatment.

“This is why men need to be screened for the disease.  The best chance to cure it is while it is still within the prostate.  Once it is out of the prostate it is usually too late.

“About 10 per cent of men will get prostate cancer and this is bad enough for the average bloke.  But there are some walking time bombs out there, men who have a father or grandfather or brother who has been diagnosed with prostate cancer.

“These men are many times more likely to get the disease.  Depending upon how many of their direct relatives have been diagnosed with prostate cancer, the likelihood that they will get it can climb up beyond 80 per cent.

“Because of this we recommend that men begin annual screening for prostate cancer when they reach 50.  If there is a history of the disease in the family then the screening should start at 40.

Paul Hutchison“We trust that this is the sort of thing that will be looked at during the Health Select Committee inquiry into screening for prostate cancer.  We have already offered the chair of the committee, Dr Paul Hutchison (left), our complete co-operation.”

Mr Young says the decision about whether to be screened for prostate cancer, and then whether to be treated for it, is a matter for each man and his family.

Men should be informed about the various pros and cons associated with the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer.

“It is a complicated business and we find that men and their families often need guidance in making a decision, but in the end the decision must be theirs, once they have been fully and accurately informed.

“The Foundation’s mission statement says our role is: ‘to create or enhance an environment to empower men to make informed decisions about the diagnosis and treatment for prostate cancer’.

“I don’t see how anyone can argue with that, and if a screening programme helps with this then we will be all for it.”

For any further information, please call Barry Young, 0274-825-253

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