Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘PROSTATE CANCER’

THE MEDICAL NEWS: As hundreds of prostate cancer researchers, advocates and supporters Advance on Washington this week and push for more progress in fighting the disease, the Prostate Cancer Foundation applauds the prostate cancer legislation introduced on Tuesday by Senator Jon Tester of Montana. READ MORE> and HERE>

Read Full Post »

PR WEB: A free guide has been published online for women with a man in their life who has been diagnosed with prostate cancer. READ MORE> Womans_Guide_to_PCa_Treatment

Women Against Prostate Cancer today announced the availability of A Woman’s Guide to Prostate Cancer Treatment: Supporting the Man in Your Life.

The new, free online, easy-to-read booklet provides information on the available prostate cancer treatment options, targeted for caregivers so they can assist their partner in making the often difficult decisions involved in choosing a treatment path.

Read Full Post »

NZ DOCTOR: Harbour Health PHO told the NZ Health Select Committee yesterday [15 September] it is just weeks away from testing an electronic decision-support tool, which describes a care pathway for the assessment and management of prostate health. READ MORE>

Men and their GPs are often confused by the conflicting messages about prostate cancer, Dr Lannes Johnson (Harbour Health PHO medical director) told the committee.

“On one hand we tell GPs not to screen for prostate cancer; on the other, we say, every man has the right to testing and advice.

“The controversy has not been resolved by the evidence-based medicine approach…But sensible decisions can be made in primary care even without consensus between urologists, oncologists or epidemiologists.

“We really cannot leave things as they are.”

PROSTABLOG NZ:  Decision aids to assist men make choices about prostate cancer treatment have been around a while, but have only recently been adapted for use via the internet.

The Australians announced in July good results with one designed for men with prostate cancer in their families. READ MORE>

Read Full Post »

PROSTABLOG NZ: The debate within medical circles about the benefits – or not – of mass screening for prostate cancer just got a little more foggy in NZ.

Parliament’s Health Select Committee inquiry into prostate cancer was due today to hear from Lannes Johnson, medical director for the Harbour Health PHO, who – if a report in last week’s NZ Doctor magazine/website is to be believed – would enthuse about the results of a “new” study just released from Sweden.

Prostablog reported (also somewhat breathlessly) on the Göteborg study back in July after it appeared in Lancet Oncology, pointing to commentary by Mike Scott at the New Prostate Cancer Infolink.

Despite the positive tone of the NZ Doctor article – the majority of whose sources depicted the study as proof that population-based screening is fully justified – Scott’s analysis does not support that.

And neither does an editorial (represented by one paragraph in the NZ Doctor article) by Cambridge University’s Prof David Neal, which appeared at the time of the Lancet Oncology report.

After rehearsing the contents of the Goteborg study, Scott had this to say:

  • This study appears to show clearly that, in a screening-naïve population of men aged between 50 and 70 years of age, biannual PSA testing can lower the risk for prostate cancer-specific mortality by at least 40 percent.
  • In addition, the study shows that the proportion of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer and requiring hormone therapy in the screening group (103/1,138 or 9.1 percent) was much less than half that of the patients in the control group (182/718 or 25.3 percent), implying that early detection also reduced the risk for metastatic disease.
  • However … the study also shows clearly that (at 14 years of follow-up) biannual PSA screening has no impact whatsoever on the overall mortality rate in the same population.

We are therefore potentially faced with the difficult question of whether mass, population-based screening that does affect disease-specific mortality but does not affect overall mortality is justifiable based on the costs, the effort, and the potential harms to the men who are over-treated.

The single most important fact about this study, as far as The “New” Prostate Cancer InfoLink is concerned, is that it finally has provided us with a highly structured, ongoing assessment of the potential value of mass, population-based screening for prostate cancer in a previously screening-naïve population.

The study also includes full treatment information on all men diagnosed with prostate cancer over the course of the study.

This means that at last we have a real baseline against which to assess the data from all other screening studies, and we can use this baseline to recognize the inherent problems of the PLCO and ERSPC studies, which include short follow-up (to date) in both studies, variation in protocols (within the ERSPC cohorts), and data adulteration resulting from PSA testing among the “unscreened” patient cohort (in the PLCO study).

The data from the Göteborg study may still not provide a convincing rationale for mass, population-based screening based on use of the PSA test, but it certainly does set the standard for what must be expected from any new test that may come along and show promise as a true screening test for prostate cancer in the future.

The one regrettable fact about this study is that if it had included just one additional age cohort (of men born between 1945 and 1950), we might have been able to gain real insight over time into the benefits of even earlier detection for a period of up to 30 years.

A much more cautious note here, then, than these comments in NZ Doctor:

“The Government can hardly say they won’t screen for prostate cancer if the science supports it,” Dr Johnson says, referring to an ongoing Parliamentary inquiry into the early detection and treatment of prostate cancer.

Auckland urologist Robin Smart says the bottom line for him is that the study shows prostate cancer screening could prevent 300 of the 600 deaths from prostate cancer that occur every year in New Zealand. “All of the results strongly suggest that PSA screening is a really good idea,” Dr Smart says.

NZ Doctor concluded:

The results of the Göteborg trial are due to be presented to the Health Select Committee next week (today, September 15) as part of its inquiry into prostate cancer. Dr Johnson will talk about the results during a presentation by Harbour Health on PHO capability for reducing the burden of cardiovascular disease, smoking and diabetes.

Let’s hope the committee takes the time to read more widely about the study.

Read Full Post »

NEW PROSTATE CANCER INFOLINK: NZ politicians currently trying to decide what to do about prostate cancer screening (the Health Selection Committee inquiry) should read the latest analysis of the big randomised European study into PSA testing.

It suggests population-based screening is not supportable. READ MORE> and HERE>

Mike Scott at this website notes:

…it is certainly a fair question for every man of 55-74 years of age and a PSA of less than 4.0 ng/ml whether he wants to have treatment for prostate cancer based on a 553 to 1 chance that treatment will actually affect his long-term survival, and given the well-known side effects of treatment.

We do believe that these data add emphasis to the value of expectant management as a method of caring for men with low-risk prostate cancer.

Read Full Post »

PROSTABLOG NZ: It’s almost a year since the first hearings were held by the NZ Parliament’s Health Select Committee inquiry into the early detection and treatment of prostate cancer.

The obvious question now is when will it report back.

Since it published its terms of reference in August last year, the committee has received 33 submissions, four of them from the influential health lobby group, the NZ Guidelines Group, whose last submission was made in December.

This document made it clear that the group – an independent incorporated society originally set up by the government in 1996 – is opposed to population-based PSA screening.

To save one life, up to 41 men could incur significant harm.

It bases this view on its assessment of numerous NZ and international studies, including two large randomised trials (one European, the other American) that were reported last year.

Here are some of the last pages of the group’s December, 2009, submission (RCT = random controlled trial):

This also appears to be the main thrust of submissions on PSA testing from other health authorities (although the Guidelines Group is at pains to stress it is independent from the Ministry of Health).

Another “official” organisation, the National Health Committee, said in its submission (August 26, 2009) that it has seen nothing to change its 2005 advice to the MOH that population-based PSA screening is not an acceptable option.

However, it did favour targeted screening of high-risk groups, such as men with a family history of prostate cancer.

The NHC is aware that since providing its advice in 2005, clinical practice has found
that targeted screening for men at high risk of prostate cancer appears to be useful
and potentially cost effective. These are men who have a family history of prostate
or related cancers.

The Royal NZ College of General Practitioners – presumably speaking on behalf of doctors on the frontline – said in its submission it would go along with the NZ Guidelines Group’s views.

It did make a couple of pleas, however, calling for up-to-date information to hand out to patients, and for treatment to be available to all:

It is important that inequities in access relating to follow up after positive
screening results, and for symptomatic men, are identified and eliminated.

The Cancer Society agreed with the Guidelines Group, and backed this up by quoting from selected organisations in other Western countries.

Most agencies around the world have some form of recommendation that decisions for screening for prostate cancer should be made on an individual basis and in consultation with a medical professional:

The Australian Cancer Council states that:
“In the absence of direct evidence showing a clear benefit of population based screening for prostate cancer, a patient centred approach for individual decisions about testing is recommended. Screening discussions and decisions should always include and take into account, age and other individual risk
factors such as a family history of the disease” (Cancer Council Au 2005).

The American Cancer Society states that:
“The American Cancer Society (ACS) does not recommend routine testing for prostate cancer at this time. ACS believes that doctors should discuss the pros and cons of testing with men so each man can decide if testing is right for him. If a man chooses to be tested, the tests should include a PSA blood test and
DRE (digital rectal exam) yearly, beginning at age 50, for men at average risk who can be expected to live at least 10 more years.” (American Cancer Society 2009).

The UK Cancer Research Council states:
“in the UK, there is no national screening programme for prostate cancer because trials have not yet shown clear evidence that screening will reduce deaths from this disease. Also, many men diagnosed with
prostate cancer have very slowly growing cancers that will never cause any symptoms or problems in their lifetime. So at the moment there is no clear benefit in diagnosing prostate cancer early and it may actually cause harm for some men.”(Cancer Research UK 2009).

Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand states:
“Individual men aged 50 to 70 years with at least a 10 year life expectancy should be able to be screened by annual DRE and PSA testing, after appropriate counselling regarding the potential risks and benefits of investigations and the controversies of treatment.”(Urological Society ANZ 1999).

The majority of submissions – from prominent medical practitioners, prostate cancer lobby groups and patients – urged the committee to recommend PSA testing, if not on a population (all men) screening basis, then at least as a service offered routinely by GPs, without men having to ask (the current MOH policy).

Read Full Post »

NEWSWIRE NZ:  NZ scientific bodies, apple growers and others say they know nothing about the possible use of cancer-causing apply spray Kepone here in the 60s and early 70s. READ MORE>

Read Full Post »

URO TODAY: Mice fed a diet enriched with 10% tomato powder – from heat-processed paste from whole cherry tomatoes (including seeds and skins) – showed a dramatic rise in prostate cancer survival. READ MORE>

This diet significantly increased overall survival rate (from 11% to 67%)…

Biochemical data disclosed an increase in serum antioxidant activity, and a reduction of serum inflammation/angiogenesis biomarkers of particular importance in prostate carcinogenesis.

Read Full Post »

NEW PROSTATE CANCER INFOLINK:  Is more better when it comes to the number of samples taken in a prostate biopsy? Not according to new research. READ MORE>

Read Full Post »

PROSTABLOG NZ: Does ginseng cure prostate cancer? Does any natural remedy? If you want to research such questions, here’s a useful web article on SciAnswers.com giving some guidelines: READ MORE>

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »