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Posts Tagged ‘prostate rowing team’

JUNE 27: PROSTABLOG NZ: Confusing news from the Indian Ocean – two boats seem to have won the 2009 rowing race, despite one crossing the finish line more than 30 hours ahead of the other.

The eights team, Aud Eamus, led over the past few days, got to Mauritius first around 4pm on June 25 GMT and was feted with a press release saying they smashed the 38-year-0ld race record by six days. They did it in 58 days, 15 hours.

But then, more than a day later at 10.40pm GMT on June 26, the fours crew, Bexhill Trust Challenger, which led most of the race, got to the finish and was acclaimed the winner.

We’re obviously missing something here, a rule perhaps lurking in the eights boat’s designation as an “open” entry, whatever that means.

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Here’s what the race website announced at 4.29pm on June 25:

A multi-national crew of eight amateur rowers (6 men and 2 women) today smashed a record that has remained unbroken for 38 years, for the fastest ever crossing of the Indian Ocean by rowing boat.

The elite crew, rowing a custom built 36ft long ocean rowing boat named ‘Aud Eamus’, set off from Geraldton, Western Australia on the 28 April 2009.  Having rowed a mammoth 3,132 nautical miles across the treacherous and unpredictable Indian Ocean, these audacious eight arrived today at Mauritius, after just 58 days, 15 hours and 08 minutes at sea, knocking an impressive six days off the previous route record.

The crew of eight comprising British nationals Simon Chalk (36), Ian Couch (39), Helen Taylor (22) and Paul Cannon (39), Americans Angela Madsen (49), Doug Tumminello (43), and Brian Flick (23), together with Bernard Fissett (46) from Belgium, were all recruited by nautical events company, Woodvale Challenge Ltd as part of the Woodvale Works Team concept.

Bringing a range of skills, adventure, ocean rowing and ultra endurance experience with them, the crew of Aud Eamus was assembled specifically with the aim of setting an Indian Ocean rowing crossing speed record.  Through their success in achieving this goal, they also claim a number of other Indian Ocean rowing records that include the first eight man crew, the first paraplegic (Angela Madsen), the first females (Angela Madsen and Helen Taylor) and the first person to row the Indian Ocean twice (Simon Chalk).

Then on June 26, a few minutes before midnight, this was announced:

After rowing a colossal 3,132 nautical miles, non-stop across the Indian Ocean, Britons Phil McCorry, (24), brother Nick McCorry (25), Matt Hellier (20) and Ian Allen (25), crew members of Boat No. 7 ‘Bexhill Trust Challenger’, made history today by winning the first ever Indian Ocean Rowing Race 2009.

Two months previously, these intrepid four life long friends from Bexhill, East Sussex set off from Geraldton, Western Australia together with nine other international crews in this unique, ultra-endurance, ocean adventure. 68 days, 19 hours and 40 minutes later, the Bexhill Trust Challenger, a 29ft long purposely designed composite ocean rowing boat, triumphantly crossed the finish line off the beautiful island of Mauritius at 2240hrs GMT today, Friday 26th June 2009.

By winning the Race, the crew of the Bexhill Trust Challenger have also become the first ever team of four to row across the Indian Ocean and crew member, Matt Hellier at the age of 20, is the youngest.

Meantime, at reporting in time about 6pm last night, third placed boat Pura Vida (the women’s four rowing for breast cancer) had 336 miles to go, while the Kiwi four Rowing For Prostate had 553

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It’s breast versus prostate in the latest developments of the Indian Ocean Rowing Race.

The four British women – rowing for breast cancer research – put in a big surge to nearly catch the Kiwi-registered, four-man boat, Rowing for Prostate (middle red dot on map).

The women (bottom green dot) clocked a massive 66 nautical miles in the 24 hours to last night, easily outdoing the prostate boys (41 miles) and the leading four-man team, Bexhill Trust Challenger (50 miles).

That brought them to within four miles of the second-placed Rowing for Prostate, in terms of distance to the finish (2914 for the prostate boat, 2910 for the breast boat, Pura Vida).

Bexhill remains well in front, with 2889 miles to go to Mauritius. It has covered 315 miles since the start from Western Australia last week, compared to 240 by Rowing for Prostate and 248 by Pura Vida.

Next best is solo rower Simon Prior (29) from the UK, who has covered 191 miles and 2965 to go.

The original 11-boat field is down to seven, with three withdrawing and one yet to start.

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